South Carolina Marijuana News

The city council in Columbus, Ohio is considering cannabis policy reforms that would significantly reduce the penalties imposed for possession of small amounts of marijuana. The council has scheduled a public hearing on a proposed city ordinance to enact the reforms for Thursday evening.

Under the proposed ordinance, possession of up to 100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of marijuana would be subject to a fine of up to $10. Those caught possessing between 100 and 200 grams (approximately seven ounces) of cannabis could be fined up to $25. Possession of more than 200 grams would still be a felony.

The fine for possession of marijuana paraphernalia would be reduced to $10. The ordinance would also increase funding to help those with previous convictions for marijuana possession offenses have their criminal records sealed.

The fines for cannabis possession would not apply to “any person who obtained the marihuana pursuant to a lawful prescription issued by a licensed health professional authorized to prescribe drugs,” according to the ordinance.

Punishments More Severe Under State Law

Under Ohio state law, possession of up to 100 grams of cannabis can be punished with a fine of up to $150 while possessing 100 to 200 grams

Read More Here…

On Monday, New Jersey’s Department of Health announced plans to accept applications for individuals and entities interested in opening operational and cultivation facilities. The agency said that it is seeking applicants to operate as many as 24 Alternative Treatment Centers, with the aim to place eight in the northern part of the state, eight in the central region and seven in the south. An additional facility will be placed in a yet-to-be-determined region, the department said. 

Moreover, the department said it intends to grant licenses for an additional 15 dispensaries, five cultivation centers and four “vertically integrated permits,” which would involve a combination of cultivation, manufacturing and dispensary. The applications, which were made available on Monday, are due on August 22; it costs $20,000 to apply, though failed applicants will receive a reimbursement of $18,000. 

All applicants “must submit a security plan and an environmental impact statement,” and demonstrate “experience in cultivating, manufacturing or retailing marijuana and provide quality control and assurance plans,” according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

The permit expansion was put in motion earlier this month when New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat, signed a bill to grant an additional 24 licenses. It’s part of an ongoing

Read More Here…

There continues to be some large gaps in justice when it comes to the state by state cannabis legalization movement. Among them is a key question; What happens to those individuals with cannabis offenses that took place before the laws changed? Believe it or not, many of them aren’t automatically, retroactively covered by new laws that decriminalize or legalize weed going forward. In Michigan, one senator is looking to right this wrong. 

On Tuesday, Senator Jeff Irwin of Ann Arbor presented a piece of legislation that would guarantee automatic expungement for those with past, low level cannabis misdemeanors on their records. Estimates project that the bill could affect around 235,000 people. That’s key, as criminal records can make a difference in people getting employment, or qualifying for state benefits. Automatic expungement would also dodge the high cost to the state of clearing cases individually in court. 

“Automatic expungement for all of our lowest-level cannabis offenders allows people to move on with their lives and making it automatic is essential because many people can’t afford an attorney, or the legal fees associated with an application,” Irwin said, as reported by Click On Detroit. “Cannabis is now legal in Michigan and petty

Read More Here…

Though cannabis remains on The World Anti-Doping Agency’s list of banned substances, WADA stopped prohibiting the use of cannabidiol in 2017. Soccer players are no longer penalized for having CBD in their systems during the World Cups.

Several sports leagues and associations have followed WADA’s lead, such as the United Fighting Championship (UFC), which oversees mixed martial arts competitions and rankings. One of its members Nate Diaz famously hit a vape pen after a match in 2016.

“It’s CBD,” he told reporters. “It helps with the healing process and inflammation… before and after the fights and training. It’ll make your life a better place.”

BIG3 CO-FOUNDER ICE CUBE ON CBD: “There’s something out there that can help that doesn’t enhance performance or intoxicate. To me, it’s simple compassion.”

Other positive signs include the recent announcement by the BIG3, the professional 3-on-3 basketball league, that it now permits players to use CBD for pain management and recovery. “These guys put their bodies on the line for us and the fans to entertain us with their talent,” says BIG3 co-founder Ice Cube. “There’s something out there that can help them that doesn’t enhance

Read More Here…

Conversations about the effects of legalizing cannabis frequently focus on a few key issues: economic opportunity, social justice, the potential for new medical treatments, and other health benefits. What’s less talked about, however, is how cannabis legalization impacts the environment. Researchers have long documented the ways unchecked outdoor cannabis cultivation can strain resources and negatively impact the environment. And data from the U.S. Department of Justice shows that a significant amount of illegally produced cannabis is grown on federal lands— especially, national forests.

But what if legalization was making a difference? That’s exactly the question a new, first-of-its-kind study set out to answer. Do cannabis-related policies have any effect on illicit grow operations in U.S. national forests? The answer appears to be that yes, legalization does impact illegal grows. In fact, it reduces them significantly.

Expanding Legalization Reduces Illicit Grows in National Forests by a Fifth or More, Study Concludes

As the legal cannabis industry in the United States expands, demand for cannabis products is growing with it. But in the U.S. market, supply and demand have yet to find their equilibrium. So despite the major changes in the production and consumption of legal cannabis over the past decade, the

Read More Here…

At least 34 cannabis plants were removed from a flower bed at the Vermont State House last week after a visitor to the state capitol in Montpelier reported their presence to law enforcement. Capitol Police Chief Matt Romei said, after the plants were discovered, that he was unsure if the young plants were hemp or marijuana and that groundskeepers on the property may have found more plants after the initial discovery.

The chief added that he was not surprised that the cannabis plants found a suitable home in the well-tended garden that lines a walkway in front of the statehouse.

“You could plant a 2-by-4 piece of lumber in there, and it would grow into a palm tree,” Romei said. “So it is totally not surprising that if somebody would put some marijuana seeds in there, they would grow like weeds.”

Growing at Home OK. The State House, Not So Much

The Vermont legislature legalized the possession of up to one ounce of marijuana by adults last year, with provisions of the legalization bill also allowing for the home cultivation of cannabis. Adults in the state are permitted to grow up two mature and four immature cannabis per residence.

Vermont

Read More Here…

A new Edmonton group wants to smoke out cannabis stigma by organizing social outings for professionals who are stoned.

Brad Ward is preparing to launch a series of events under the banner of Meet and Green.

His ideas include movie showings, charitable events and getting 20 or 30 people to smoke a joint, put on name tags and go on a hike together.

“I’d like to do something where we go out and support new businesses, like mom-and-pop restaurants that open up,” Ward said. “I think that could be really interesting, having a lineup of people who just smoked a joint with the munchies supporting a new pizza place.”

– Read the entire article at The Star.

Read More Here…

Governor of New Hampshire Chris Sununu has played a key role in the crafting of the state’s medical cannabis legislation. On Friday, in the latest of a series of cannabis vetoes, he struck down a bill that would have eliminated a requirement that patients have at least a three month relationship with their marijuana provider. But on the same day, he did sign into effect HB 399, which will have positive repercussions for those with past cannabis convictions. 

The latter will make it possible for those with past offenses concerning quantities of up to three-quarters of an ounce to have their conviction annulled. The legislation will apply to those whose offenses happened before September 16, 2017, the date when the state enacted sweeping decriminalization measures (becoming the last New England state to do so) that did not enact retroactive measures for past victims of Drug War policing.

Such annulments, however, will not be automatic. Individuals will still need to petition the court to have the offense erased from their criminal record. Prosecutors will have 10 days after the petition to object to the crime’s annulment.

“[This legislation is] going to affect hundreds, if not thousands of people,” the bill’s sponsor,

Read More Here…

As one who has followed the cannabis sector closely for over six years, I have seen lots of ups and downs for its publicly-traded stocks. Investors today have, in my view, the opportunity to own some companies that have bright futures, but that wasn’t so much the case even three years ago, when most retail traders were still focusing on companies that were just silly penny stocks. Because these greedy opportunists continue to try to exploit retail investors even now, despite the vast improvement in the sector, I want to share some history from the past few years with the hope that readers will learn that they should just ignore these fraudsters and wannabees.

When I transitioned my professional focus to the industry in the nascent days of the cannabis stock market, all of the stocks traded “over-the-counter”, meaning that they weren’t listed on a major exchange, like the NYSE or NASDAQ. Today, while these exchanges are off-limits to American companies that grow, process, sell or distribute the federally illegal substance, they have opened to similar Canadian companies as well as some ancillary companies that serve the industry. Most of the primary listings for U.S. and Canadian cannabis operators are

Read More Here…

Report co-author says results are preliminary but promising.

Researchers at the University of Saskatchewan say preliminary results suggest medicinal cannabis oil can reduce or completely stop seizures in children experiencing severe and drug-resistant epilepsy.

The study, funded by Jim Pattison’s Children’s Hospital Foundation, monitored seven children with severe pediatric epilepsy, a debilitating condition that can cause children to suffer as many as 1,200 seizures a month.

Dr. Richard Huntsman, a pediatric neurologist at the university’s college of medicine and one of the study’s authors, said the results are nascent but encouraging. The overall reduction in seizures was close to 75 per cent on average.

– Read the entire article at CBC News.

Read More Here…