South Carolina Marijuana News

CROSS LANES, W.Va. (WSAZ) — A new shop is open in Kanawha County, and the owners says it will provide countless health benefits, relieve pain for customers and even help fight the drug epidemic. Ahead of the store’s grand opening Saturday, the owner also wants to educate the public about how it all works.

Appalachian Cannabis Company is opening a store in Cross Lanes. They sell CBD products.

In layman’s terms, CBD (Cannabidiol) is a compound of cannabis that will not make you high.

Owner Chris Yeager explains it more technically:

“What we do is all hemp-derived CBD products,” he said. “In cannabis, you’re going to find somewhere between 100 and 110 cannabinoids. In those, they have different effects. They do different things like for instance, THC is psychoactive. So when you consumer THC, that’s when people say you get high. There’s other cannabinoids and the CBD portion of that is going to be the non-active. So folks will not get high by consuming CBD but it has great medicinal value.”

He says CBD is a compound

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Updated 10:48 am, Friday, August 18, 2017

BETHLEHEM, Pa. (AP) — The lawyer for a New Jersey woman accused of driving from a funeral in South Carolina under the influence of marijuana in a crash that killed her two grandchildren says his client wasn’t high.

Police filed charges last week against 55-year-old Nadine Walton, of Newark, following the Sept. 14 wreck on Interstate 78 near Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

She was arraigned Friday.

Walton’s attorney says his client didn’t drive under the influence. He says drug tests can detect marijuana up to about 30 days after use.

Authorities say they found marijuana and 49 Oxycodone pills inside Walton’s purse and several bottles of alcohol in the car. They say she tested positive for pot.

Five-year-old Ravon Robinson died at the scene. His 2-year-old sister, Brielle, died several days later at a hospital.

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Catch up on

Ozark: (Available on Netflix) The dark thriller follows financial planner Marty (Jason Bateman) and his wife (Laura Linney) who suddenly relocate their family from Chicago to the Missouri Ozarks after his partner double-crosses a Mexican drug lord in a money-laundering scheme. The cartel kingpin puts him on the clock to make good on a new plan, but the locals prove as surprising as the show, which in its own way offers an oddly relevant portrait of America. Earlier in the week, the series got a quick renewal for a second season.

This week

The Last Ship: (9 p.m. Sunday on TNT) In its fourth season, the Navy destroyer continues on its mission to find a cure after a global pandemic has wiped out 80 percent of the planet’s population.

Episodes: (10 p.m. Sunday on Showtime) Entering Season 5, TV writers Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) have experienced the worst of Hollywood but are still standing along with the vapid star of their show (Matt LeBlanc).

Survivor’s Remorse: (10 p.m. Sunday on Starz) The fourth season

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Make for me a sanctuary and I will dwell among them (Exodus 25:8)

As teenagers go, the boys and girls of Chabad are unusually well-traveled. Every summer they are recruited by Chabad emissaries from Norway to New Zealand to volunteer at the popular Gan Israel day camps. They are called again for winter camps and to help during other Chabad events in the course of the year, becoming frequent flyers at a relatively young age.

I too, enjoyed this rite-of-passage of sorts in my teen years. For a girl who’d never left New York, I had a feeling I wasn’t in Brooklyn when I got to Kansas. I spent two years working at Lubavitch House in Minnesota where the winters were frigid and the people were chipper for no apparent reason. And when I crossed the Great Plains and got to sunny California where the fruit grows, I understood the power of place.

Those were memorable days, and the opportunity I had to spend time with the motley mix of people who came often to Chabad, was eye-opening. In particular,

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Make for me a sanctuary and I will dwell among them (Exodus 25:8)

As teenagers go, the boys and girls of Chabad are unusually well-traveled. Every summer they are recruited by Chabad emissaries from Norway to New Zealand to volunteer at the popular Gan Israel day camps. They are called again for winter camps and to help during other Chabad events in the course of the year, becoming frequent flyers at a relatively young age.

I too, enjoyed this rite-of-passage of sorts in my teen years. For a girl who’d never left New York, I had a feeling I wasn’t in Brooklyn when I got to Kansas. I spent two years working at Lubavitch House in Minnesota where the winters were frigid and the people were chipper for no apparent reason. And when I crossed the Great Plains and got to sunny California where the fruit grows, I understood the power of place.

Those were memorable days, and the opportunity I had to spend time with the motley mix of people who came often to Chabad, was eye-opening. In particular,

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The weed came from Colombia or Jamaica, and the hash was from Lebanon, but in the 1970s and 80s Lowcountry most of the drug smugglers were homegrown.

Kingpin Barry “Flash” Foy of Charleston was a Columbia boy. He had scrapes with the law early in life and ended up learning the smuggling trade in Florida. He said when things got crowded down there, he landed on Hilton Head, invited by his friend and fellow smuggler Les Riley, who also grew up in Columbia.

Almost 200 people, all but a couple of them with no prior criminal record, were swept into a mighty rush of cash, marijuana and hashish that crash landed with indictments and jail time for many of them in a legendary twist of Lowcountry lore called “Operation Jackpot.”

And it could soon become a movie.

“We laundered a lot of money,” Foy, now 67, told The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette in a recent interview. “Millions. Plural. Tens of millions.”

For the kingpins, that meant parties, women, Lear jets, luxury cars, yachts and oceanfront homes.

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The Effingham police department reported the following incidents. There were no injuries or citations unless otherwise listed.

• At 1:46 p.m. Aug. 16 at 1200 N. Keller, a motor home driven by Robert Barkwill, 87, Williams Bay, Wisconsin, pulled into the path of and was struck by a vehicle driven by Kiefer F. Bathe, 17, Shelbyville.

• At 2:53 p.m. Aug. 16 at the intersection of 3rd and Kreke, a vehicle driven by Linsey N. Camp, 22, Chaffee, Missouri, pulled into the path of and collided with a vehicle driven by Theresa L. Shaw, 49, Effingham. Shaw sustained injuries and was transported by ambulance to HSHS St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital for treatment. Camp was issued a ticke for failure to yield.

• At 4:01 p.m. Aug. 16 east of the intersection of Keller and Avenue of Mid-America, a vehicle driven by Cherissa V. Dial, 22, Effingham, rear-ended a vehicle driven by Sarah M. Pfenninger, 36, Effingham.

• Michael E. Seaton, 29, Flora, was issued a citation for operating an uninsured motor vehicle on Aug. 16.

• Dalton W. Allen, 22,

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LumiGrow Inc., a smart horticultural lighting company, announced today their partnership with CF Industrial, a lighting and power solutions provider in Leamington, Ontario. The new partnership bolsters LumiGrow’s commitment to their Ontario greenhouse growers, further providing responsive local support for those implementing smart horticultural lighting for precision greenhouse management. The CF Industrial team is yet another addition to LumiGrow’s Ontario-based services, as the company has already deployed plant science research support across the region, according to a press release.

“We are happy to welcome CF Industrial as a LumiGrow Canada Partner. This partnership will ensure that our superior level of technical support can be deployed immediately upon short notice. Our local lighting specialists will be able to personally visit and consult with commercial growers in Ontario, assisting with lighting implementation, as well as environmental and horticultural considerations.” says VP of Sales and Marketing, Jay Albere.

CF Industrial has been a symbol of reliance and service excellence for over 35 years. Jason Papp, CF Industrial Business Operations Manager says, “It’s important for us to find partners that share our values of long-term customer

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Weed shops in Oregon are gearing up for some heavy activity during next week’s total solar eclipse. The astronomical event will occur next Monday, August 21. Oregon weed dispensaries expect 1 million visitors to come into the state to see the eclipse.

Solar Eclipse In Oregon

American Eclipse 2017

In all likelihood, Oregon will be a hotbed of activity during the eclipse. That’s because it lies directly in the eclipse’s path of totality.

On top of that, Oregon is one of the most weed-friendly states in the U.S. Medical weed has been legal there for years. Then in 2015, recreational weed was legalized, and in 2016, dispensaries started selling recreational cannabis.

The combination of having great views of the eclipse in a state where it’s easy to get weed could lead to some big-time tourist activity.

In fact, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management is already making plans. The agency has put together resources outlining ways to manage all the visitors the state expects to see.

Additionally, it published a statement that

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GLOVERSVILLE –On Saturday, state police charged Thomas J. Doak, 20, of Johnstown with unlawful possession of marijuana.

Speeding results in DWI, other charges

JOHNSTOWN — Gregory J. Hentnik, 27, of Amsterdam was charged by state police on Sunday at 4:38 a.m. with failure to obey a police officer, speeding in excess of 55 mph zone, speeding in a posted zone, having a blood-alcohol content of 0.08 percent or higher, driving while intoxicated, aggravated DWI and reckless driving.

No seatbelt leads to marijuana charge

MOHAWK — Sean S. Bouton, 26, of Tribes Hill was charged by state police on July 4 with unlawful possession of marijuana and no seatbelt.

Man charged with criminal contempt

ST. JOHNSVILLE — William K. Schorer, 32, of Ilion, was charged by state police on Aug. 9 with second-degree criminal contempt for failure to obey a court order.

3 charged with being on railroad property

ST. JOHNSVILLE — Three people were charged by state police on Monday with trespassing on railroad property and having stolen property. Charged with third-degree criminal trespass and fifth-degree criminal possession of stolen

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