South Carolina Marijuana News

The Cannabis Cup, High Times’ signature competition, has gone virtual. And now, it’s coming to Oklahoma. 

In what will be the first ever competition open to the public in the Sooner State, the “High Times Cannabis Cup Oklahoma: People’s Choice Edition” will look to award the best marijuana products from Tulsa to Lawton, Oklahoma City to Muskogee. 

The competition will be open to only medical products, which must be grown and produced in Oklahoma at a facility licensed under the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority, which was created by a measure passed by voters in the state in 2018 that legalized medical cannabis. It will also feature the largest pool of judges in the competition’s history. 

The coronavirus pandemic has forced the Cannabis Cup to go virtual. Last week, High Times announced that its inaugural Hemp Cup will be the first High Times competition to go online. The event was originally scheduled to take place last weekend in Austin, Texas, but instead will be held on April 4 via Facebook Live. The Oklahoma competition is being carefully planned to include minimal human interaction, while also encouraging maximum participation throughout the state.

The Cannabis Cup in Oklahoma will kick off in early

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Coronavirus has been great for cannabis sales. In most states with approved cannabis programs, both medical and adult use marijuana sales have been designated “essential services” by state and local governments. With this support, the supply chain has weathered the COVID-19 pandemic better than many industries. Still, the pandemic continues unabated and cannabis businesses are far from secure.

Over the past month, the federal government has attempted to throttle the sputtering economy with varying forms of stimulus. Some of the efforts have been undertaken by the Federal Reserve (slashing the federal funds rate; debt purchase commitments) and some by the Internal Revenue Service (pushing out deadlines). But Congress and the President have taken matters further. In this post, I’ll summarize the three “phases” of Congressional stimulus, and their implications for cannabis businesses.

Before diving in, it’s important to draw a bright line between forms of cannabis defined as “hemp” and “marijuana” under federal law. In the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp was removed from the definition of “marijuana” under the federal Controlled Substances Act. Although heavily regulated, hemp is no longer controlled in the classic sense. For this reason, qualified hemp businesses should be entitled to the same stimulus relief

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In many jurisdictions with legal marijuana, businesses in the cannabis industry have been deemed essential services and permitted to remain open during shutdowns ordered to help slow the spread of the coronavirus. And while most companies appreciate being able to stay in operation during troubling economic times, doing so presents its own challenges to keep employees and customers safe.

At Harborside Inc., the company’s six stores in California and Oregon remain open to serve patients and adult-use customers and its cultivation facility in Salinas, California is still in operation. But it hasn’t been business as usual. The company now offers curbside or drive-through pickup at all four of its California stores, and enhanced sanitation protocols have been initiated.

“The health and safety of our customers and employees has always been our priority, and we know how important this is now more than ever,” said Harborside interim CEO Peter Bilodeau in a press release. “We are committed to the important role that Harborside plays in providing our communities with essential cannabis products during this critical time, and to doing our part to slow the spread of this virus.”

Harborside has implemented a number of new measures in its stores, including limiting

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When it comes to the enjoyment and appeal of any given cannabis strain, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Not to mention, the circumstances which call for consumption in the first place.

In some instances, nothing will do better than a heady, energising and uplifting high that motivates you to conquer the world. In others, melting into human puddle of pure laziness for hours on end is the way to go. However you feel and whatever you have in mind, there’s an endless array of strains to choose from.

But what if you’re looking for a more balanced experience?

Right now, the commercial cannabis market is packed to bursting with well-balanced sativa/indica hybrids. There’s also a growing market for strains with a pretty even ratio of THC and CBD. In both instances, you can expect a beautifully balanced high that delivers the best of all worlds and is perfectly controllable.

As for the best in the business, we strongly suggest checking out the ten frontrunners outlined below:

Cannatonic

Recipient of multiple awards and packed with plenty of CBD, Cannatonic also has a pretty perfect split of indica and sativa genetics. Cannatonic was engineered by combining Reina Madre

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Holly Haines likes to describe herself as a “foodmaker” rather than a chef. “I feel like [chef is]not only a title, but also a rank that is earned working in a restaurant. I worked at Subway in high school, but I don’t think that counts.”

So while she isn’t technically trained, Holly has built a loyal following of fans who love her thoughtful spins on classic recipes, like experimenting with ube (a purple sweet potato from the Philippines) and her preference for using black cocoa powder for her famous “black-ass” desserts. (Psst… here’s a recipe for her black-ass dulche de leche brownies.)

Holly also advocates that people eat their feelings. In fact, she wrote the book on it: How to Eat Your Feelings is a recipe book about how cooking can be a form of meditation. She also has other recipe books like Best of Instagram: Desserts and SIDES, a collection of small bites, sides and dessert recipes (all available for download at itsholly.com).

– Read the entire article at Pacific San Diego.

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Cooking And Coping is a series by @HungryEditor profiling people on what they are cooking and how they are coping in this new world as we practice social distancing.

Diana Tsui is a writer, editor, and stylist based in Los Angeles, California. She’s currently the editorial director for a cannabis company. Before that she was the senior market editor at New York Magazine’s The Cut.

Benjamin Liong Setiawan: What’s a recipe you’re loving right now?

Diana Tsui: My current favorite is making pork, shrimp, and chive dumplings. You can make a huge batch and freeze them. Plus it’s a nice way to keep your hands busy during these uncertain times.

– Read the entire article at Forbes.

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The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) legalized hemp by removing the crop and its derivatives from the definition of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and by providing a detailed framework for the cultivation of hemp. The 2018 Farm Bill gives the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulatory authority over hemp cultivation at the federal level. In turn, states have the option to maintain primary regulatory authority over the crop cultivated within their borders by submitting a plan to the USDA.

This federal and state interplay has resulted in many legislative and regulatory changes at the state level. Indeed, most states have introduced (and adopted) bills that would authorize the commercial production of hemp within their borders. A smaller but growing number of states also regulate the sale of products derived from hemp.

In light of these legislative changes, we are presenting a 50-state series analyzing how each jurisdiction treats hemp-derived cannabidiol (Hemp CBD). Today we turn to South Carolina.

Before the enactment of HB 3449 in March 28, 2019, the cultivation of hemp was strictly limited in South Carolina. Indeed, the South Carolina Department of Agriculture (“SCDA”), which oversees the production of hemp, could only issue

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Every adult in Petaluma did not get a delivery of cannabis last week. It only seemed that way to Dave Tohill, a kind of mobile “budtender” for Mercy Wellness, the Cotati-based dispensary. In a single day, Tohill had 40-plus deliveries in Petaluma alone.

One of his customers was a woman who’d spent the morning working in her yard, just off Maria Drive.

“I’ve driven past your house three times today,” said Tohill, as he delivered her package. “I like what you’ve done with the pavers.”

– Read the entire article at The Press Democrat.

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Zachary McCreedy was looking for an innovative product to create. Something small, simple and reasonably priced, he says, that people use every day.

The 26-year-old entrepreneur from Norfolk, Virginia half jokes that he first thought about creating a new kind of spoon. “Spoons are used by people all over the world billions of times a day,” says McCreedy. “Imagine the glory of inventing a better spoon. Nobel prize worthy if you ask me.”

Five years ago, McCreedy decided to take a hiatus from college to give more attention to a website he’d created about table tennis. People were loving the 20 or so informative articles he had featured on his site and he was pulling down a few hundred dollars a month of passive income.

– Read the entire article at Forbes.

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CANNABIS CULTURE – The first event to take a hit was the Stepping High Festival, slated for March 20-21st in Negril, on Jamaica’s west coast.

It’s the longest running ganja festival in Jamaica and a staple on the event circuit. Ready to make it’s 17th appearance, organiser, Karlene Connell, stated in a release that the event was suspended indefinitely. This seems to the state of affairs with events and cannabis tourism not being exempt. 

This was the first in what may be a litany of event cancellations and vacation halts for the 2020 tourist season. The high-season runs from January to March and tourism is Jamaica’s largest income earner. With the amendment to the Dangerous Drugs Act, in 2015, cannabis is not fully legal in Jamaica, but one can carry up to 2 ounces and licensed dispensaries can sell cannabis products. Tourists and visitors are required to have a statement from a medical doctor or medical cannabis card to get access to medicinal marijuana products from legal dispensaries and herb-houses. 

Some local dispensaries also accept State issued medical marijuana cards from the United States. The Corona Virus may have started to spread at the outset of the early months

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